LEARNED OPTIMISM MARTIN SELIGMAN EBOOK

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Editorial Reviews. riapeocaconcou.ml Review. Martin Seligman, a renowned psychologist and clinical researcher, has been studying optimists and pessimists for Editorial Reviews. riapeocaconcou.ml Review. Martin Seligman, a renowned psychologist and E.P. Seligman. Religion & Spirituality site eBooks @ riapeocaconcou.ml Editorial Reviews. riapeocaconcou.ml Review. Martin Seligman, a renowned psychologist and site Store; ›; site eBooks; ›; Health, Fitness & Dieting.


Learned Optimism Martin Seligman Ebook

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Read "Learned Optimism How to Change Your Mind and Your Life" by Martin E.P. Seligman available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and. Get this from a library! Learned optimism: how to change your mind and your life. [Martin E P Seligman] -- National Bestseller The father of the. Offering many simple techniques, Dr. Seligman explains how to break an Learned Optimism is both profound and practical–and valuable for.

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Learned Optimism

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You already recently rated this item. Your rating has been recorded. Write a review Rate this item: Preview this item Preview this item. Learned optimism: Martin E P Seligman Publisher: New York: English View all editions and formats Summary: National Bestseller The father of the new science of positive psychology and author of Authentic Happiness draws on more than twenty years of clinical research to demonstrate how optimism enchances the quality of life, and how anyone can learn to practice it.

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If you have not received your delivery following the estimated timeframe, we advise you to contact your local post office first, as the parcel may be there awaiting your collection. In fact, Seligman describes studies that seem to prove that pessimists are much better at seeing the world as it really is. Unfortunately, pessimism leads to serious consequences -- poorer health, less success on the job, and a less fulfilling personal life.

Pessimists give up, or they never try in the first place. So much for starting an exercise regimen, going back to school, asking somebody out, etc.

The author explains how to balance optimism and pessimism and when to listen to each voice, though of course it could take a lifetime to perfect this process. I got so much out of this book that I volunteered to give a presentation on it at my workplace, which is not the kind of thing I usually do.

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Jan 01, Gilgamesha rated it liked it. Seligman, known as the father of positive psychology, convinced me through endless examples of research done by experts on how an optimistic outlook on life can lead to better quality of life and success and happiness and a tool in overcoming adversity.

I really enjoyed the first half of the book but the second half became excessively repetitive. He inundated me with too many examples of scenarios that the optimism questionnaire was successful in The end of the book Seligman, known as the father of positive psychology, convinced me through endless examples of research done by experts on how an optimistic outlook on life can lead to better quality of life and success and happiness and a tool in overcoming adversity.

The end of the book was a bit of a let down though. I understand the need to change the narrative of your inner dialogues but that is the extent of his recommendation on how to achieve optimism.

He gives several different examples of how the ABCDE method could be used to rewrite your own pervasive and permanent thoughts about adversity.

While all of this is great I was hoping he actually also gave examples of research settings where this method is shown to work. He didn't get into that at all but expects us to trust him this the effective way to overcome pessimism. I am not convinced. Jan 20, Ginget Poulton rated it really liked it. Really excellent Some of it of course a bit out dated but so agree with most all of it!

Oct 05, Kathryn rated it really liked it Shelves: I was expecting Learned Optimism to be as airy-fairy and worthless as Full Catastrophe Living , and was very pleased to discover that it is quite the opposite. It is a scientific treatment of optimism and its effects on how people respond to problems; that is, it examines who gives up and who perseveres, and why. Seligmann has been studying optimism his entire life. He leads us through his intellectual journey, beginning when as a young grad student, he was exposed to a study in which a group I was expecting Learned Optimism to be as airy-fairy and worthless as Full Catastrophe Living , and was very pleased to discover that it is quite the opposite.

The professor was confused, but Dr. So then-student Seligmann and another grad student, with the reluctant agreement of the PI primary investigator , devised a new experiment. They took three groups of dogs. The first group was shocked, but were situated such that they could learn to turn off the shock by pushing a button with their noses.

The second group received exactly the same shocks as the first group, but without any buttons; that is, their shocks stopped when the other dogs, unbeknownst to them, pushed the button.

The third group received no shocks at all. Finally, the dogs were placed in the shuttlebox. Those from the first group leaped out to escape the shocks; those from the second group lay down and gave up; and those from the control group also leaped out to escape.

The book proceeds to explain Dr. He performed a similar experiment on humans, in which pressing the right combination of buttons would turn off an annoying sound for one group, while another group could do nothing to turn off the sound, and got the same results when the humans were placed in a situation where the annoying sound was easily escaped.

However, there was a flaw. Among both dogs and humans, there were certain percentages of the first group who never tried, and there were certain percentages of the second group who never gave up. So Dr. Seligmann continued to explore the concept of optimism. He eventually found that there are three dimensions: Experiments have demonstrated that moderate pessimists often have a much better handle on reality than optimists.

And you can learn to be optimistic, by identifying whether your pessimism is personal, pervasive, or permanent or some combination , and learning to dispute the pessimistic part of yourself. So why listen when part of yourself says that?

Dispute yourself the same way you would dispute someone else. Sep 06, David rated it liked it Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I had a very divided reaction to this book. The Pros: As a result of his research, Seligman offers real, learnable, and proven effective techniques for learning to be more I had a very divided reaction to this book. As a result of his research, Seligman offers real, learnable, and proven effective techniques for learning to be more optimistic.

It is certainly one of my favorite concepts in psychology. Furthermore, I love that he challenges the notion of the exponential rise in depression today as being a largely genetic phenomenon. I found this to be some very refreshing common sense. The unprecedented level of depression in this society today cannot be attributed to biology or solely to biology — something else is at work here. However, it only makes sense that something in our society is going on, perhaps at times triggering particular genes on a wide scale, to create such an unprecedented level of depression.

The three major hypotheses of explanatory style were also quite enlightening: In addition to these hypotheses of explanatory style are the three essential aspects of explanatory style: The Cons: The main problem for me was that Seligman seemed to create too much of a mutually exclusive relationship between optimism and realism. One quote I found rather disturbing to illustrate my point: Seligman, I may be misreading you, but you lost me here. This is a serious problem that has not been examined adequately I suspect that he generated a lot of empirical data, and was a little too eager to tailor his theory to fit in with this.

Having spent some time in corporate America, I believe this false optimism is creating record levels of denial in our country, which seem to be extending at an alarming rate — all in the name of being more optimistic. Only towards the end of the book does he seem to write more about the perils of optimism with a brief section in the middle regarding depressives having a more accurate memory and owning up much more readily to both their failures and their successes rather than the optimists who tend to look upon the past through rose-colored glasses.

In all fairness, he does write a little bit about the problem of a lack of personal responsibility today and how he has no interest in personally endorsing this kind of psychology.

Lastly, on a minor note, I believe he is too overconfident in his beliefs why women suffer depression at a rate twice that of men. While this is an established statistic, there is much debate over what this statistic means exactly. Are women somehow biochemically or hormonally predisposed to depression?

Or do they report it more readily than men? Do men hide their depression through substance abuse or other non-constructive outlets? May 20, Nikolay rated it it was amazing. But worth it. This book validated so many of my life beliefs, so from now on, it may be the confirmation bias speaking: Still, here are few pieces I strongly related to. I think I am good example of this — I am bad at being sad and this has helped me at often being moderately happy.

The core idea is that in addition to our talent and our desire to get better at something, success also depends on how we explain why things happen, or our explanation style. There are three aspects of it: Permanent — optimists think it too shall pass, while for pessimists the bad stuff is never going to go away.

Of course, a healthy pessimism is much needed sometimes. Those who blame others for their errors are assholes, in addition to optimists.

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And when errors are costly, pessimism can be a lifesaver, making us think through the worst of outcomes. Optimism is not a silver bullet, but learning more about it has helped me understand better why I am the person I am. And being more conscious of my explanation style has helped me be more in control of my own actions. Dec 20, Steven rated it liked it Shelves: I do not like Seligman because of his research on animals. People who think it's OK to give electric shocks to dogs have made me learn pessimism about human compassion.

Learned Optimism: How to Change Your Mind and Your Life

Seligman created a ground-breaking experiment which was first performed with dogs back in the sixties. Three dogs went through each experiment. The first dog was given electrical shocks which stopped whenever it pressed a panel with its nose. It got shocks, but had the power to stop them.

The second dog got shocks whenever the fir I do not like Seligman because of his research on animals. The second dog got shocks whenever the first dog got them. This means that it received exactly the same amount and duration of electrical shocks as the first dog, but it had no chance to affect this.

The third dog got no shocks. Here the dog is given an electrical shock that it can easily escape by jumping over a low barrier. So did dog number three that had gotten no shocks. But dog number two just lay there, feeling powerless to change its conditions.

It had learned helplessness. The good news is, that we can also learn optimism. Seligman introduces a tool in the book which will let us challenge the pessimistic thoughts and assumptions that many of us have running through our heads at frequent intervals.

Mar 31, Farideh rated it it was amazing Shelves: First, I'd like to reassure those concerned about a severe shift in my temperament that I only read this book on the advice of my psychologist and would have never touched a book with this title otherwise. I found the nugget of wisdom at the core of this book to be extremely helpful and ultimately worth the read.

But even then, I think ascribing the thought patterns described as "optimism" and "pessimism" is a misnomer. Ultimately it's about positive and negative self talk and the impacts those First, I'd like to reassure those concerned about a severe shift in my temperament that I only read this book on the advice of my psychologist and would have never touched a book with this title otherwise. Ultimately it's about positive and negative self talk and the impacts those things can have on motivation and learned helplessness.

That's it! The rest of the book is hilariously bad. The two major problems that take up most of its content are 1 it is out of date 2 the author is sketchy. I would really like to see an update of these concepts written by someone else who can incorporate the last 20 years of advancements in psychology.

What can I say about this dude? He has strong opinions about optimists and pessimists but fails to identify himself as either. I first started to get skeeved out when he pretty much blamed his father's mindset for his suffering after he suddenly fell paralyzed, ill, and possibly brain damaged.

He comes off as a sociopathic creep at worst and a smug opportunist at best. For example, most of his core research was done on behalf of insurance companies trying to figure out how they could best retain salespeople.

Why was a tenured professor taking a handsomely paid side gig helping telemarketers sell financial scams and how could such an obvious conflict of interest be construed as legitimate research? Hey, it was the 80s! The chapter about the laughably subjective CAVE method and analysis of sports teams was an obvious attempt by the author to get to spend more time with his son. His practical advice veers between the absurd and hypocritical he advocates parents postpone divorce because of the negative impacts it can have on children but got one himself.

There are better and more thorough critiques of Seligman and his legacy of dog torture a Google search away so I will end mine here, other than to say that he comes off like an alien trying and failing to demonstrate human emotions.

If you have to try this out, the abridged audiobook is only 2 hours long. Feb 26, Maithreyi Mulpuru rated it it was amazing. Books offers a scientific approach towards recognizing your depression triggers and how you can unlearn pessimistic behaviors to inculcate more positive action oriented thinking.

Overall, liked the book for its practical guidance and the fact that it's based on quantitative research. I spotted this book, a freebee discard at the local library recently, 'Learned Optimism'. I thought, this'll be good for a laugh. The first chapter is titled 'Two Ways of Looking at Life'.

Only two ways, how depressing is that! Chapter four sounds more up my street, 'Ultimate Pessimism'. It is odd there is no listing of sceptics or cynics in the index, there's a few mentions of being skeptical.

The index does list 'catastrophizers', which gets interesting. Apparently, catastrophizers are into I spotted this book, a freebee discard at the local library recently, 'Learned Optimism'. Apparently, catastrophizers are into Permanence and Pervasiveness. Permanence is about time and Pervasiveness is about space. I'm now about one-third into the book, it is good.

Talks about Behaviorists V Cognitivists. What is really interesting is the section around the orthodoxy of Behaviorism. It says that "since World War I, American psychology had been ruled by the dogma of behaviorism. I'm really getting into this book.And while I generally agree with his theory that the epidemic of depression has hit us because of our increased focus on the "I" and individual rights, coupled with a decrease in the "We" ie community, country, duty, God, meaning , it leaves unexplained why groups such as stay-at-home mothers, one of those last valiant troops left fighting in the "We" battlefield, are at particular risk for depression.

Nobody knows why this is.

If you think your problems are temporary and limited in scope: Pessimism can become a self-fulfilling prophecy. A failure or a defeat can teach you that you are now helpless, but learned helplessness will produce only momentary symptoms of depression—unless you have a pessimistic explanatory style. Report as inappropriate.

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